Cannot Be Bo(a)rdered

Cannot Be Bo(a)rdered

Cannot Be Bo(a)rdered is a visual exploration of youth rebellion through skate culture. The exhibition will explore popular 20th century subcultures in new works by 34 artists/collectives from France, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. Using the skateboard as a primary medium, each work challenges existing stereotypes by

reconstructing a new narrative through different creative styles and visual expressions.

 

Cannot Be Bo(a)rdered was first commissioned for the Aliwal Urban Art Festival (AliwalUAF) by Arts House Limited (AHL), as part of Singapore Art Week 2016. It travelled to Urbanscapes in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 23 April – 8 May 2016, where nine Malaysian artists were added to the lineup.

 

In 2017, the Singapore Embassy to France invited curator Iman Ismail and AHL to present the exhibition at the Urban Art Fair in Paris. Nine French artists from Paris.

 

Here is a sample of the work that was showcased. As you can see, it exceptionally creative. Here’s hoping that the work will eventually wind up here in North America!

 

 

        

OASIS Skateboard Factory

OASIS Skateboard Factory

The Toronto District School Board has an unusual school located downtown. I’ve had the privilege of working with Oasis for a number of years. I am proud to publish this story   When Skateboarding Meets Video Games By Jessica The world is boring. Every day is the same trudge through work or school and all of your decisions are controlled by your parents, teachers or other authority figures in your life. This may not be how it is in reality, but many teens do feel this way about their lives. One stereotype of teenagers is that they are impulsive so adults try and take control of their lives and make decisions for them. Is it any wonder why teenagers struggle for some feeling of agency? This is the sort of things both skateboarding and video games can fix. Both of them offer a sense of rebellion against authority and taking control of your own life and decisions, finding meaning and purpose and escaping from that grey everyday world. The parallels may not seem obvious at first. Skateboarding is usually done outside while you usually play video games inside. We also see videogames as more of a mental sport while skateboarding is a physical one, although this is not always the case. As a person who has always been passionate about video games and who has used them as a coping mechanism, I can see parallels between what I get out of video games and what people get out of skateboarding. For me, video games have been about leaving behind this life and going into another’s, becoming a hero. I am given so much more power than in my physical life, I know that I’m important now and I become proud and confident. Skateboarding can have the same effect. At first you may be quiet and aloof, doing little to interact with others, but as soon as you’re on a skateboard, you transform. You are no longer unsociable, you are now loud and confident, you’re no longer you, you’re the Skateboarder. As The Skateboarder you have so much more power and can do so much more with your body than you could do before. With becoming another person, you lose the restraints of your old self and gain a new identity around other people. In these new identities, you find purpose. It’s easy to find purpose in these two activities because they give you reachable short term and long term goals that revolve around you succeeding. In video games, you have to complete levels and defeat enemies, while the long term goal could be defeating the villain or saving the world. With skateboarding, short term goals include trying new tricks and getting better at them while long term goals could be contributing to the subculture’s community. Giving purpose makes people feel motivated to keep living and to continue trying to get better regardless of failure. For a long time society has seen video games and skateboarding as inherently dangerous for teenagers and children, leading them to lives of apathy and laziness. Of course, they’re wrong. Society consistently overlooks the positive effects of skateboarding and video games and how they can aid teenagers and children with their mental health. From these different outlets, it’s possible to find the meaning, purpose and identity that teenagers can ground themselves in and find some sort of peace.  

Vans Pool Party 2017

Vans Pool Party 2017

 Dan Bourqui has put together a great video of the highlights of the competition.  

2017 VANS POOL PARTY 
FINAL RESULTS

Pros
1st  Tom Schaar
2nd Cory Juneau
3rd  Clay Kreiner

Legends
1st  Steve Caballero & Lance Mountain (Tie)
3rd Tony Magnusson

Masters
1st  Andy Macdonald
2nd  Chad Shetler
3rd Lincoln Ueda

 Dave Duncan announced and again pretty much lost his voice. The level of skating was pretty much like it always is – completely off the charts!  Steve CaballeroThis gentleman is from Tribo skate mag. (Brazil)   

Hover Skate VR

Hover Skate VR

Skateboarding finally has its first Virtual Reality video game and it’s called “Hover Skate VR”.  John Hinton, a skateboarder from Florida, developed it independently. The game is controlled with your hands and you can learn and master 250 skateboarding tricks. As its name implies, your skateboard is hovering instead of rolling, only touching down for grinds and slides. You’re in Virtual Reality world, so why not, right? As you make your way around various cityscapes, the terrain features lots of ledges, rails, and stairs.  In the pro shop you can pick which shoes you want to wear, or deck you want to ride. Hover Skate VR has teamed up with Dan MacFarlane to bring Mentality Skateboards to the game. As you virtually walk around the pro shop you can hand pick a Mentality deck off of the shelf while the “Skateboarding Realms” video trailer plays on the shop TV screen.  For the soundtrack, Missouri skateboarder and music artist Jonathan Toth From Hoth has contributed songs off his skateboarding themed album “Sick Boys” to keep you in full on skate mode as you play.     “It’s fun and challenging like real skateboarding” says Jeremy Eyring, a skateboarder and avid player of the game. Hover Skate VR is played on PC only and requires a HTC Vive, or Oculus Rift VR headset. While it’s still a work in progress you can get early access and give feedback as it is perfected and built upon.  John Hinton says he plans to add a new skatepark level to the game in the near future.  Get Hover Skate VR here.