Flow to Pro featuring: Enzo Cautela

Flow to Pro featuring: Enzo Cautela

In the world of sponsored skateboarding, the path to the top has been generally accepted for decades: from flow to amateur to full-fledged professional. For the Enjoi Skateboards crew however, the announcement of Enzo Cautela as an official member of their pro team has completely shaken this order up. In this case, Enzo skipped the amateur level altogether to become one of the few skaters in recent years to go #flowtopro.

Though Cautela circumvented the amateur level, this doesn’t mean he hasn’t paid his dues to enter the big leagues. Over the course of his seven years as a part of Enjoi’s flow program, Enzo started to make a name for himself in more recent years by popping up at events like Thrasher’s 2016 Bust or Bail contest and throwing his signature hardflip down a colossal triple set. That same year, he earned his big break after being invited to join the Enjoi team as the lone flow rider on Thrasher’s King of the Road.

Airing on VICELAND for the second time, the skateboarding world was formally introduced to Enzo as the underclassman brought along to see if he could prove his worth both on and off the board. From getting handcuffed to Enjoi bossman, Louie Barletta, to destroying his heels on a massive stairset, it was clear that Cautela paid his dues along the way. In the end, the trip was a big step in the right direction for him though, with Enjoi taking the trophy and Cautela taking the award for Best Rail Trick.

Since the road trip of a lifetime, Cautela remained committed and spent his days filming what would become his debut pro part, which recently debuted at the grand opening of the new Pharmacy Boardshop in Long Beach. Between hammers like 360 lipslides and varial heelflip 5-0 grinds, the part would have been a standout even without the final banger. Leaving it all on the line though, Cautela went on to  stomp a massive 20 stair hardflip to shut the video down. As if the ending wasn’t sweet enough, the clip concludes with his unshackled partner in crime, Louie Barletta, proudly unveiling his debut pro model board for Enjoi and affirming the ultimate rite of passage.

For someone who has made the ultimate jump from 0 to 100, Enzo has remained cool and collected as his name circulates the skate world’s headlines. Describing his celebration after the trick as casual trip to Whole Foods and his plans to use his first pro check to continue eating healthy, Cautela appears to be staying on his grind and maintaining the lifestyle that got him to where he’s at today. In fact, speaking on what the nod to the pro-level meant for him, Cautela nonchalantly told us,

“I’m just a skateboarder but that’s cool everyone thinks I’m pro now.”

Remaining humble to the team that enabled him, Enzo was also quick to add, “Thanks to Enjoi for this opportunity and thanks to everyone showing support! Gang gang!”

Those looking to take Enzo’s first pro board to the streets for themselves can do so exclusively at Pharmacy Boardshop locations or via Thank You Supply. Those looking for a wall piece can even pick up a signed edition of his deck online at as well. 

All photos courtesy of Enjoi Skateboards.

Way of the Road: Zach Slaughter Interview

Way of the Road: Zach Slaughter Interview

Everyday, people put their lives on the line for skateboarding and pay heavy prices for doing so. However, few people that have ever set foot on a board can say that they’ve sent it and gotten broken off the same way that frontman of Skull Fist, Zach Slaughter can.

Aside from being a badass singer/guitarist from Canada, Slaughter is a ripping street head  who broke his neck attempting a kinked rail back in 2013. Despite this and a collection of other gnarly slams, Slaughter has graduated from small scale skate sponsorships to living the heavy metal dream, releasing albums and touring with his Skull Fist bandmates. In preparation of the drop for their third album, Way of the Road, released through Napalm Records, we shot Slaughter over a few questions regarding time on the board and the influence that it’s grown to have on his music.

Who are you and how did you get involved in skateboarding?

I am Zach, singer and guitar guy of Skull Fist. I’ve been skating since I was real little in Northern Canada. I remember the cops, the punks (Being one of them) and the baggy pants. I stepped in near the end of the ‘little wheel’ phase – when those ‘Skateboarding Is Not a Crime’ stickers boards mattered.

Skating was for the outcast shitheads that had no other interests. I’ve been skating ever since. I sent sponsor-me tapes when I was 16 and got sponsored by a few small companies when I was a kid but then got into music as a “career” instead.

Let’s get straight to it, what’s the story behind breaking your neck?

Man, it was the end of a session. We had just seen this 6 flat 6 with a wooden rail and thought it would be funny to try and boardslide it. There was grass beside so I thought I’d just roll into the grass. Nope.

It was dark, I went to catch myself with my hands as I was about to faceplant but I swiped at the ground and missed apparently. Broken neck – lucky no spinal cord damage. I also broke my cheek bone, cracked my forehead and got a gnarly head scar from it. That’s not even the worst. I always get the weirdest skate bails, I cut my sack open with a jagged board once and got 12 stitches.

 

Are you able to focus more on music during your recoveries?

Yeah, music has always been the main attraction for me. Skating is like a meditation/zen thing now – I do it to chill and think about nothing else. I try to skate a few times a week, although I tweaked my knee last month and am currently on a break. Honestly man, breaking the neck was real calm. I just laid around for a month and relaxed. I had a real long concussion that made Super Mario really hard to beat though (laughs).

How does your style of music correlate to your style of skateboarding?

I grew up with street skating. Tons of skull fist songs are about skating or have plenty of references to skating. I skate recklessly, I think – always trying to push my abilities, which I suppose is why I always hurt myself. I just think [about] pushing it and always feeling the mad rush from rolling away from something.

Crushing obstacles, you know? Spending hours trying a trick and shitting your pants with hype after you land it. I think heavy metal/punk is a lot like that. I listen to tons of different music and if it’s Neil Young I usually just end up rolling around the skatepark doing half-assed ollies looking at the clouds.

What’s something about Way of the Road that people don’t know, but should?

It was recorded in a week, minus the vocals. It’s the first album we’ve done without all the 80’s sounding reverbs and shit. It’s the first album we’ve done without our little skull dude on the cover too.

Any particular skater-fronted or skate-oriented bands that you’re backing these days?

The Shrine. They are from California – really good band. There’s a band here in Toronto called HEAD too. The drummer/singer shreds on the board.

Those looking to get a listen to Way Of The Road will have to wait until it drops on October 26th. Stay tuned to the latest from the band on their Facebook here or from their Instagram here.

Melancholia and Darkness: Martin Ander Interview

Melancholia and Darkness: Martin Ander Interview

Buying a new deck is one of the greatest feelings a skateboarder can experience. Unfortunately, it’s also one of the most guilty. Especially in those moments just after walking out of the skateshop with a shining new deck that displays a thoughtful graphic with full knowledge that some artist poured their blood, sweat and tears into curating it. Without further ado, you head straight to the nearest flatbar and smear their work across a cold steel beam without even a second thought. For anyone that’s ever done this to a Flip Skateboard, odds are that the tragedy might have come at the expense of one of Swedish illustrator, Martin Ander’s graphics.

Luckily for guilty parties, the folks at Dokument Press have you covered as they proudly release their latest title, ‘Ouff! Mander Selected Works.’ Now, skaters, fans and art connoisseurs can keep a testament to the work of Ander’s 25+ year illustration career in the form of a hardcover publication without worrying about chipping any paint. Clocking in at just under a hundred pages, Ander has managed to cram over 200 original illustrations into the pages of this work and has supplemented text throughout to help carry the narrative. While we could take a stab at trying to articulate the allure of his thought-provoking work, it’s clearly better to let Ander’s illustrations speak for themselves. For that, the snapshots of this book provide a glimpse into what we’re talking about here.

In addition, we posed Ander with a few questions just before the title’s European release party. Ranging from his beginnings in the skateboarding world to eventual developments in the creative process, have a look at what Ander has to say about his efforts to make viewers go Ouff!

I thought one of the most important points from your press release was that the skateboard industry found your work. How exactly did your professional relationship with skateboarding industry begin?

Well, it came quite naturally, I’ve been skating since 1985 and know most of the skaters in my generation of skaters in Sweden, and everybody knows that I like skateboard graphics and draw a lot.

I did skate zines and did some illustrations for a skate mag here in Sweden long before I got to do graphics. My first paid job in the skateboard industry was drawing posters and illustrations for eighties pro freestyler, Per Holknekt’s, skate shop in Stockholm back in 1990.

In 2007, when my friend Martin Karlsson started a company called Bellows Skateboards, he asked me to do some graphics for them, they had the same distribution as Sweet Skateboards, which was one of the big skate companies in Sweden at the time. They saw my work for Bellows and asked me to do graphics for them too. After that came Seven Inch Skateboards from Finland and Polygon from Sweden which I was part owner of for a while.

Then I got the contact with Flip Skateboards via Ali Boulala, I contacted them and got to do lots of graphics for them too. That was about five or six years ago I think. I’ve always been freelance – I want to work with everybody. The past year I’ve done graphics for Sweet again, and both Sunrise and Scumfuc skateboards from Chile, Chrononaut from Sweden and RVCA.

Between huge names like Flip to smaller names like Polygon, are there any differences in your creative process when designing graphics for larger brands versus smaller brands?

All clients are different. The biggest difference is that I’m friends with most of the Swedish clients and their teams and they totally trust me to do something cool. In a small market, it doesn’t have to be as commercial. The decks will sell anyway and the team is stoked that I do their graphics. Working with a bigger company means more people involved, more opinions, more decks per series and of course, the need to follow the brand’s aesthetic idea more and to keep the team riders happy.

What’s the craziest part of seeing a wall full of boards displaying your work on them?

The coolest part is to see a kid picking down a board and looking at the graphic, just like i did when i was a kid with the VCJ and Jim Phillips graphics.

Can you explain any of the reasoning behind fusing what’s been referred to as “melancholia and darkness” with bright colors?

I don’t really put too much thought in to that. I’m not really a melancholic dude, but my work tends to be a little bit dark sometimes. Maybe its me just trying to make the images look a little bit more fun, or it’s the fact that I love old blacklight posters. My work is quite detailed – lots of things happening at the same time. By adding bright colors to it, I can make the important stuff ”pop” and tone down some of the not so important details.

Frida Talik’s account of your book describes how it provides an “insider view” to your work. How do you think it does that?

I myself buy a lot of books about artists, cartoonists and illustrators. And usually they don’t contain that much: one image per page, mostly stuff you have already seen and hardly any text. I wanted to give the audience what they pay for so in Ouff!, there’s one long interview, two shorter texts and over 300 images, camped in to 96 pages. I have not tried to just put the absolute best stuff for the coolest clients in the book, there’s a little bit of everything. Just like the life of an illustrator.

What was it like to take art that you would usually have endless canvas space for and consolidate/reformat it for the purposes of the book?

At first it was hard. Most of my images is drawn to be pretty big and I had to scale them down to fit in the book. I had to think of every spread as an art piece in itself and [think of] the images in it [as] parts of a bigger picture, not art pieces themselves. It was the opposite from showing in a galley, where every piece hangs by itself on a white wall. I was afraid that I would lose the details in some of the images, but I think it worked out great. You don’t read a book the same way you read a poster or a skate graphic.

Any parting words about the book/your artistic career that you’d like to share?

The book is called Ouff! Mander Selected Works. It dropped in Europe on Sept. 20, and drops in the USA/rest of the world on Oct 25. Follow me on Instagram for new work: @manderoid

All photos provided and authorized and provided by Dokument Press and Martin Ander. Portrait photo shot by Petter Danielsson.

New! Submit Your Posts to Be Featured!

New! Submit Your Posts to Be Featured!

Well, we’re back from Hiatus!  We’ve been in the lab, not so much with a pen and a pad, but with some good things cooking, and some major changes coming up (stay tuned for an upcoming post).  But, until then we have an awesome new addition to the website where you can submit your content for us to feature!

Featuring Real Skaters, Sponsored or Not!
This is our way of connecting with the real skate world, sponsored or not, to feature real skaters from the real skate world – downhill, street, freestyle, longboarding, even art – anything goes!

Feature What?
Mainly we’re looking for Instagram posts or YouTube videos since they have easy links that you can submit.

Feature Where?
Once you submit your clips or pics, our editors will review them.  If they’re approved, we will insert your Clip, Pic, or Article into an awesome new post in our Blog or re-post on our Instagram page.  Some lucky contestants may even be contacted to be featured in upcoming editions of our submit-skate-print magazine!

Submit to Get Featured!
If you’re interested in submitting content to CW to feature, simply hit up our new Skate Content Submissions page here:

Submit Skate Content Here
So.. You Think You Can Longboard Dance?

So.. You Think You Can Longboard Dance?

So.. You Can Longboard Dance? 2018 Worldcup Longboard Freestyle and Dance (flatland disciplines) 6th edition APRIL 21st and 22nd 2018 Klokgebouw Eindhoven The Netherlands competitions. Entry is free for spectators. 
Bianca Kersten heads up Flow Provider and she is in charge of the event. We contacted her from her home in Spain.
For those who are new to the party, what is it about longboard dancing?
Longboard dancing is riding a longboard in your own style, with flow (speed, consistency, combos) and creativity (innovation is important in competitions). It includes dancing that is accompanied by a variety of technical tricks.
How did Flow Provider become part of this movement – and what was the impetus to start the SYCLD
Already since 2003 does Flow Provider organise projects within street culture and street sports. Mainly events and programs in school. We believe in making a circle: pro’s inspiring people to start who are taught bij <retired or not> pro’s who can make a living out of their passion this way. These new inspired people who are taught form the new generation of pro’s and so the story continues. I believe in taking care of the whole circle to maintain a healthy scene. I use to manage a building on the opposite side of the Klokgebouw. Jan, the owner told me that I should just ask whenever I wanted to do something. It was bad weather and we wanted to skate. And so we did.. and the whole world came. Things lined up.. I had the time and knowledge to make an event out of it (which was necessary because of the huge amounts of people that wanted to come), I have the love of longboarding and knew the people in the scene and the owner of the Klokgebouw supports us in an unbelievable way. So.. it became ‘So.. You (think you can <- the first edition this was added) Can Longboard Dance?’ as a joke because the event that was her big sister, in Zwolle NL, was called ‘Dancing with the Stars’. Nobody knew it would lead to this. And I think the secret of the succes and growth is that there is no ulteriar motive. As long as a bunch of people have fun skating and inspire others, SYCLD is a succes.
What are some of the goals of Flow Provider?
The goals of Flow Provider is inspire, connect, educate and spread the stoke. Get people to feel what we all know about. The feeling of motion on a board and the butterflies and joy that gives. What it means if you can live your passion. I guess that is also the strength of organising SYCLD. I love every moment I can spend on the beach and in the ocean, so I only want to spend time behind the computer doing what I love, my time is too precious to me. SYCLD is an event I love to organise because it’s all about positivity. Everyone wants the best for it and each other. Even the sponsoring brands don’t want to dominate each other. Everyone supports it and loves doing so because it’s nice! Teaching longboard is also so nice! I was teaching thousands of kids and the smiles are the best! So inspire and get those who are inspired to inspire others. The pebble in the water..
For SYCLD I would like to have one event on every continent or in every region. The winner wins a trip to Eindhoven to have a shot at the title of World Champion. I think everyone should have the chance to attend and that a plane ticket to Eindhoven should not be the reason that maybe the biggest hidden talent somewhere can’t come. I think Brenno’s story is so inspirational. Did a crowdfunding campaign to get money for a ticket from Brazil to Holland and luckily he made it because he became world champion that year! And this changed his life!
For those who’ve never attended a SYCLD, what should they expect?
A huge venue of 5000m2 where you can skate, watch and enjoy yourself! With the nicest people on the planet doing things on a board that seem impossible. Just enjoy, skate and relax. The event is both days (21st and 22nd of April) from 13.00-22.00 and on Saturday there is a party nearby. Many competitions and much space to skate with obstacles. Eindhoven is also an awesome city. Most innovations and new developments in design are coming from Eindhoven. For those who can’t make it there will be a live broadcast!
Need more info? Visit sycld.nl
The New Wave is Live!

The New Wave is Live!

Welcome to the new website.

Pardon the dust. We hope you like the new website and enjoy it! But, it’s far from done. In fact, it will never be done, because we will always be working on improving it to keep up with it’s own natural purpose to be an extension of the skateboarding world that has shaped us. The site will continue to improve in this regard with a mission to evolve forever with skateboarding rather than focus on resisting change or why things aren’t “the same” anymore. How can we ensure supporting and keeping up with the evolution of skateboarding? Simple. By being by skateboarders, for skateboarders, always, and never losing touch with the real world of skateboarding. That’s exactly where you come in. We want to see your images and clips and read your stories. Please, FILL this site with the real world of skateboarding and help us make it about the roots while we at the same time find new and cool ways to connect and evolve with the people that make skateboarding awesome. With this mission in mind, to connect real skaters everywhere of all styles and skill levels, this site isn’t just for you as a skater:

This time, it’s by you.

What do we mean?  How can you help build our community and the skateboard industry?  Well, it’s not just about reading awesome editorials by Michael and Bud & and others (they have done a fantastic job over the years so hats off to them).   We will always have that side of the mag and we hope to support it in new ways through the new site.  But, this time when we do it’s about the community, about the skaters creating content and getting out there on the web with us, to share in the stoke.  So, we want to read YOUR posts and articles. We want to let YOU be the publishers, too, right along with us. We will be in forums with you and we hope to generate an actual two way dialogue within the industry and skate community that helps us do our best to craft the site’s evolution according to what YOU want out of it and what the skateboarding world really wants. No corporate agendas. Real skaters. How can you specifically get involved?

Well, so many easy ways:

  1. Sign up and show your support by completing your profile and putting a face to the name.  Put a cover photo and profile photo up and you’ll show up in our community page.  Feel free to use your real name or a pseudonym, it’s up to you!
  2. Post in the forums.  Share your skate pics, your skate instagram posts, your skate clips, your stories, your skateboards, your designs, your opinions, and your passions.  But, most of all, share the stoke and spread high fives and positive vibes.  Haters and negatrons will be banned!  Try to have fun.
  3. Read our past issues and watch our vids!  They’re up on the site and we’ll be adding more and more media to enjoy.
  4. Design custom finger boards and skateboards in the shop.  This feature is being rolled out to certain members only in the first week, and it will go public to everyone.  So, sign up soon to be part of the early release! If you don’t see it yet, just check back in a day or two.
  5. Share us on social media.  Read a cool article or see a cool post?  Share it on FB, IG, Pinterest, or wherever you like to share!
  6. Check Back Often!  We’re posting frequently now that we’re up and running, and we’re releasing more really awesome sections soon so don’t be a stranger!
  7. Go Skate!  Don’t forget why we do this!  Skateboarding isn’t broken and never was.  It’s still is and always was one of the purest forms of freedom and self expression by just having fun. You just have to do it to find out. Get out there.  Get on your board.  And, go sk8.  Do it your way! Don’t conform. Do what you want! And, if you do document it, then when you get back…. post and share your stoke here with us and forever be immortalized in our new forums that will one day be considered the new archives by the skaters, for the skaters.  We, for starters, are eagerly waiting to read all of your stories and comments see all of your awesome clips and pics just like you’ve been reading ours over the years.

Let’s Go!

We’re excited to see what the skateboard community can be here on the new wave.  But, don’t worry, the old wave will always live on as well as we also pay tribute with awesome throwbacks and past issues.  Hopefully both can come together in one space, and we can share the stoke old and new, as we transition into the next wave here in 2018.

Thanks for reading and being a part of this movement.  We have a LOT more than this coming thru the site and all of the great sponsors and groups we’re working with right now to connect networks all over the world through skateboarding.  Stay tuned, we’re just getting going!

Now let’s go skate.