Made in Venice DVD

Made in Venice DVD

For those lucky skaters who visit Venice, your journey there would not be complete without stopping by the City’s incredible skatepark. It was skate legend Jesse Martinez who led the charge to get the park built. His tenacity and pure stoke for skateboarding accomplished something truly remarkable.

The story of how the Venice skatepark came together is told in the documentary Made in Venice. Click here to view the trailer.

Drone overview of the Venice Skatepark

We are pleased to let you know that the film has been released in the U.S. on the following platforms: iTunes, Amazon, Microsoft Store, Google Play, VUDU; and On Demand at Xfinity, and Dish. In Canada, UK, Australia, Ireland, and Sweden you can see it on iTunes. Later this year, Made In Venice movie will be on VHX-Vimeo for WORLDWIDE viewing.

Note: The DVD ($14.99 + shipping) plays in ALL Regions and can be ordered worldwide through the
Made In Venice website.

Virgin Blacktop World Premier

Virgin Blacktop World Premier

This Saturday, in MORRO BAY, California, the world premier of Virgin Blacktop will take place. Thanks to the work of Charlie Samuels, this 23-years-in-the-making film will finally be unleashed formally to

the world. This is not to say that it hasn’t been seen. It has – in Nyack, New York back in fall to a local audience. But this particular moment in Morro Bay is the official world premier. I’ve seen the film TWICE and I can tell you that is absolutely is a masterpiece. It is 100% pure stoke. No skater will be unmoved. In fact, I think once this film works its magic on the skate world, you’ll see change within skateboarding. Positive change.

Virgin Blacktop isn’t just about skateboarding. It’s about community. It’s about how we as a society get a long. It’s about life and it’s about celebrating people’s lives. Unlike the Dogtown and Z Boys film which hit 18 years ago, this movie is in completely different head space. If you’re an old school skater, you won’t know any of the main characters (except if you’re a freestyler and the name Joe Humeres rings a bell).

The film will make you think about the positive energy that the act of skateboarding gives us all. If it doesn’t make you want to leap out of your seat and grab your board, chances are you’re either dead or comatose.

To Charlie Samuels and all of the Wizards who are featured in Virgin Blacktop, thank you for inspiring me to love skateboarding that much more! Your film and story is lesson for us all.

You don’t need to be sponsored by Vans to be a Wizard. Nyack, NY November 2017

 

 

 

Thank You, Marc Johnson

Thank You, Marc Johnson

As we just reported, Lucas Beaufort created an exceptional documentary called Devoted. He has just released a 19 minute extended video of his interview with legendary skater Marc Johnson.   https://vimeo.com/242846999“Did you ever see anyone take a laptop to a bathroom?” Marc asks. He is unabashedly a devotee of print. THANK YOU, MARC, for your support! Below, the full video.      

Devoted – A Documentary About Skateboard Media

Devoted – A Documentary About Skateboard Media

 

Those familiar with the name Lucas Beaufort may remember the piece we ran on his wildly popular artwork earlier this year. Behind the colorful characters he paints on top of magazine covers, ads and other skate photos, Beaufort told CW, “My goal is to bring something special to the world. I don’t want to come out with something that you see everyday.”

 

In the time since that last piece ran, Beaufort has again caught the attention of the skateboarding world in different way: his documentary on the legacy and future of print media, “Devoted.” In the hour long feature, some of skateboarding’s top professionals, photographers, writers and videographers chronicle their feelings on a variety of different issues currently facing print media today.

 

Speaking about the how’s and why’s of this project in an interview with Jenkem, Beaufort mentioned that his intent is “more about showing the new generation how important print was before the internet era. But I think it would be interesting to know what they think about the documentary.” With that being said, I logged into Gmail and shot Beaufort an message to venture some questions and share some thoughts I had on “Devoted” based on my “internet era” mindset.

 

To explain a bit further, I should express the predicament I find myself in regarding the subject. I became immersed the skateboard world well after the explosion of digital media, HD video and internet-based content, yet I write for a print magazine. I very often interact with people who lived through an all-print era and continue to fight to prove the value of print today. I look up to those who pushed skateboarding through the work of printed publications and I’m every bit intrigued by the stories of yesteryear, where the industry’s greatest surprises and announcements warranted sanctity in the pages of a monthly magazine. These are moments that Beaufort recalls by stating “back in the days you could (before Internet) you could surprise people with projects, now it’s almost impossible. You always have somebody to spoil it through Instagram.”

 

At the same time though, I wake up every morning scrolling through an Instagram feed to see how many dream tricks have come to life over the past couple hours.

 

 

This is something that Beaufort dually expressed support of by saying “Social media is also a super good tool to promote whatever you want and if you don’t have the big media to support you.”

 

However, as I find myself writing for this print publication’s digital website, I remind myself that embracing my overall position of neutrality is probably the best way to continue being able to relate to both sides of the coin. Featuring people dealing with similar iterations of this juxtaposition is, by far, the defining element that makes “Devoted” as special as it is.

 

In regards to the divisions between print and digital, Beaufort himself told me, “To be honest with you I like both. I like to dream with a print photo in my hands as I like to connect super fast with people around the world through social media.” On one hand, he is supported in the documentary by the likes of Steve Berra and Jaime Owens, who support the potential of print magazines, if executed in a sustainable way. On the other hand, his dreams are perhaps more passionately supported by the likes of Skin Phillips stammering with “I don’t know’s” and Marc Johnson nearly in tears over the possibility of a future without print media.

 

 

Former editor of Transworld Skateboarding and the Skateboard Mag – Dave Swift

 

These are critical firsthand accounts of the future of skateboarding’s media landscape as volunteered by some of the foremost players involved. In the end though, the ultimate question of “Where do we go now?” is left to interpretation and subject to the progression of whatever the future may hold. Speaking on this, Beaufort told me “With Devoted I’m not here to tell skateboard magazines who they have to talk with or how do they have to run it. Being that there is a crucial element of the right mixture of people needed to blend together though, Beaufort continued “It’s a team effort. Print has to do the best to get more readers, it sounds cheezy but it’s true. It’s the same with everything, if you want to survive you have to be extremly good, especially today.”

Pro Marc Johnson is devoted to skate mags.

 

With that being said, I wholeheartedly encourage anyone who wonders where those magazines that used to come to their door have gone to take a look at Lucas Beaufort’s “Devoted” for a comprehensive look into where they came from, where they have gone and when they’ll be delivered next.

 

Check out “Devoted” in it’s entirety here

New Tom Sims Documentary – Pure Juice

New Tom Sims Documentary – Pure Juice

 

There’s a new Sims documentary coming out soon and we had a chance to chat with Scott Clum who has been working on it for some time. For more info on Tom, see this issue: 

 

 

 

 

Concrete Wave: You worked with Tom – what was your role and what was it like working for him?

Scott Clum: My role working with Tom was two things:, 
As design director I worked on Milpas St in Santa Barbara at the SIMS offices with Tom on a daily basis. We talked a lot about skateboarding and snowboarding and how we could engage with the current audience. This was in 1985. Tom was really concerned with keeping up with the times, as he didnt want to have people look at SIMS as not being involved in the scene. Tom never ran out of ideas, he was super creative. 

 

As a team rider, I was always skating ramps and banks with local guys and the team. You had to stay current on your style and tricks for the pipe and racing. SIMS was all about this progression and it was a priority for Tom.

SNOW VALLEY – VERMONT 1983{Left to right}  Keith Kimmel, Unknown, Unknown, Eric Moynier, Tom Sims, Scott Clum, Allen Arnbruster. Photo: George Potter

 

Of all the stories you have about Tom, what specific tale really shows what he was like?
Well, thats a hard one. This one has to be my fave for many reasons…

We were outside the SIMS offices in Santa Barbara and Tom said to me one afternoon, “Hey do you want to go skate? I was like yeah sure, where do you want to go…? He was all ” I know a place, We get into his BMW 2112 and drove up to the TEA BOWLS. We walked up to the edge and got our gear ready. I had never been, It was unbelievable. huge place. The initial roll down was crazy, a commitment for sure. Tom got set up and never even hesitated, not a second. I was blown away as he hauled ass down the huge wall and made these killer carves and turns in the other side. Tom had his longboard of course and I had my pool board. It was killer, I still remember the feeling and how big this place was and how fast you went. We skated for about an hour and then went back to the office.. It was unreal.

 

I have a lot of memories with Tom but for everything Tom stood for that session was straight to the core of who he was both in skateboarding and snowboarding. No hesitation, attacked with style. That was what Tom is all about. A great day for sure and a fond memory.
 

Tom at Tahoe in 1982. Photo: Jim Cassimus 

Describe some of the surprises you encountered in making the documentary?
I don’t know about surprises, but I will say our initial hurdle was to come together on the vision. My partners Eric Jeffcoat and Erich Lyttle had different views than I did. We all wanted the same thing, just different approaches. Its always tough creatively to create a team direction. We all put egos aside and came together on strategy and a common vision. Both of these guys are super talented so together we have a solid direction and a strong commitment to the film.

 

Most young snowboarders and skaters might not know about Sims contribution to action sports. Why do you feel his name is not as well known as other pioneers?
Right. The new riders link up with what  they know and what’s current. I dont think its intentional at all. It is really easy to distance yourself from initial history mainly because you focus on now. Its not until someone turns you on to new thing that you become aware of it. Everything is association and your personal circles. My circle grew up with the initial pioneers because it was actually happening in real time! I think there are riders who educate themselves and want to know about the history of snowboarding and skateboarding so they know from a certain distance. This story will be amazing both inspirationally and educationally, people will see where things started and why snowboarding and skateboarding are the way they are. Tom played a major part in where we all came from.

Scott Clum at Dreamland’s Donlad Bowl, Donlad, Oregon. Photo: Bud Fawcett

What do you want viewers to come away with after viewing this documentary?
I want viewers to appreciate Tom. Tom was super dedicated to all riders. He was dedicated to his company more than anyone could know. He loved skating and snowboarding so he would do whatever he could to help you either directly or with the equipment. If you ride, you have a responsibility to yourself to know what he did for you and what he did for the evolution of all riding. I guarantee,  after seeing this movie you will dig Tom and youll want to work on your riding.. [ ha ha.. ] really, after watching, youll want to watch it again. You will definitely have a better appropriation for your own riding and boarding overall. Thanks Tom…

What has been the one key challenge (other than financial) with respect to this project?
A key challenge is, as a group to get the story right and to give the viewer the best experience we can. For me directly, its memory [ and time, ha ha.. ]. There is so much to tell and so many people to involve to do it right. I really want to pay respects to as many people in the story as we can. A lot of these guys are legends both in snowboarding and skateboarding. Tom was an amazing pioneer and innovator, we want to show all that in the film so we can educate the perspective as well as honor the guys on this journey.
 

What would your life been like had you not worked for Tom?
I met Tom in 1981. I called him about the yellow skiboard deck and it took off from there. I was making my own boards at the time and I also had a yellow roundtail Winterstick. Tom was interested in my riding and immediately tried to convince me to ride a SIMS snowboard. He was super nice about it though. That was the beginning of it all. I still remember the call like it was yesterday.

If I hadn’t worked for Tom, I would probably be in Manhattan at an agency doing the creative thing. Id still be skating and snowboarding but on a different level I guess. I am an artist and designer at heart. I have had my own design studio since 1987. I have worked in agencies all over the world in design, graphics, directing and editing. Being creative is like riding. Its expression.

 

Skateboarding and snowboarding have always been a priority so I have worked in the industry from day one. I am grateful for having the opportunity to have worked together with Tom. We battled, we created and we rode together. I loved his competitiveness, It reminds me to go for it, to be prepared and do your best. I miss our conversations and our ideas for new projects. He’s there, whether its a backyarder or lines down the mountain, his spirit is always with me.

 

 

Check out their Kickstarter campaign here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Bittersweet September

A Bittersweet September

September has been a rough month for a lot of folks. We lost the entire Silverfish site, including all the archives. The plug has been pulled and for many skaters, the loss of this site, strikes them at their core. There were MILLIONs of posts and a lot of great info. There were also trolls, hackers and other folks that for whatever reason, helped to create a path for the final demise of the site.  Of all the thoughts that folks had about Silverfish, I think this post from Toronto local Chris Barrett resonates with me the most:  Then, just last week, Brad Edwards was untimely taken from the skate world. Brad had a such a great personality. A big heart and love for skateboarding that was endless. He will be missed.  Then, this morning I learned that Dennis Dragon passed away a few days ago. Here is the info from Skate and Annoy – click image to be taken to the site.To add to this, today marks the 3rd anniversary of my father passing away. I seriously can’t believe three full years have gone. I wrote about the experience of skating in the halls of the hospice. As surreal an experience as you can hope for. Again, click the image to read the full articleDespite all this discussion of death and loss, I am writing to let you know that there is something coming down the pike that will absolutely blow your mind. It’s a new documentary on skateboarding that literally took over 2 decades to put together. The film is called Virgin Blacktop and it is truly pure stoke. 
Back in 1976, Charlie Samuels began filming his friends skateboarding. Forty years later, this is his love letter to skateboarding. I got the same feeling watching this film as I did with my experience with the documentary about the Z Boys. I happened to be in the audience in September of 2001 when Stacy Peralta unleashed his documentary – you know the one that was actually inspired by Spin Magazine.
 Here’s a little section from the piece you might not know about – and yes, I was the one (along with Paul Schmitt who told Spin about the book Concrete Wave that led to editor Dave Moodie asking to see the proofs – which eventually led to Greg Beato writing the article! If you skated, or know someone who skated during this time, be prepared to have a flood of memories hit you like a tsunami. The documentary Dogtown and Z Boys was able to give people a glimpse into a culture that was primarily only known by skaters. It resonated with lots of other folks too. The Dogtown skaters were legends back in the day and the film was an amazing tribute to their efforts.  The vast majority of skaters like me who were really into the scene back then will see so many similarities with the skaters who appear in this film. They weren’t really featured in the mags – and if they were, it was minimal coverage. Only one (Joe Humeres) really became a well known skater (in the area of freestyle). Virgin Blacktop is literally dripping with emotion and goes along way to explain the camaraderie that is found with skateboarding. I am not going to give too much away in this mini-review. But I will say this, with all the deeply unsettling things that have been part of this month, Virgin Blacktop was a tonic for my soul. This film cuts deep and it will have skaters and non-skaters absolutely spellbound. Just last week there was a sneak preview of the film in France. It took the Best Documentary Award at the Paris Surf & Skateboard Festival. My sense is that this film will turn Sundance on its head! Charlie Samuels poured blood, sweat and a tremendous amount of tears into this incredible film. Our plan is to ensure that skaters everywhere get a chance to see it and experience the way it really should be seen: with friends in a theater. I cannot stress how profound this film is – it is an absolute masterpiece that will make you want to get out there and skate.   

Made in Venice Documentary

Made in Venice Documentary

Made In Venice is a documentary, directed and produced by Jonathan Penson. It features the inside story of the skateboarders of Venice, California, and their struggle to make the dream of a skatepark come true. The film is now being released nationally by award-winning indie distributor, Abramorama, following its sold out L.A. premiere. Watch a preview here: This feature-length documentary carries the viewer through the history of Venice to present day, as it tells the story of the decades it took a relentless crew of skateboarders, surfers and civic activists to convince the City of Los Angeles to build a skatepark in the area that gave birth to modern skateboarding. Made In Venice is not just a skate movie. It’s a tale of audacity, guts and hope filled with counterculture characters that overcame all obstacles to claim victory. Anyone that has fought for what they want can identify with this film. This is the story of visionaries that refused to give up the goal to build concrete terrain for future generations.The film captures the firsthand stories of 40-plus years of skateboarding in Venice that started with the Z-Boys, and continued with its legendary street skaters and the iconic Venice Skatepark. Never-before-seen Super-8 and early video footage, along with rare black and white stills, take you back to innovative demos on the Boardwalk and skating the walls of the Pavilion, as the Venice skaters pushed the boundaries of street skating and put it on the global map.As Dogtown and Z-Boys author and skateboarding’s resident historian, C.R. Stecyk III says, “Made In Venice is a step by step manifesto for skate/civic activism. It is a remarkable documentation of hard working visionary individuals transforming society.”Made In Venice features appearances by skateboarding legends, professionals, skatepark activists, skate icons and heroes: Jesse Martinez, Geri Lewis, Christian Hosoi, C.R. Stecyk III, Skip Engblom, Jay Adams, Jeff Ho, Aaron Murray, Scott Oster, Cesario “Block” Montano, Jim Muir, Tim Jackson, Ray Flores, Eddie Reategui, Eric Britton, Dave Duncan, David Hackett, Joey Tran, Pat Ngoho, Wally Hollyday, Jimbo Quaintance, Joff Drinkwater, Nathan Pratt, Solo Scott, Jamie Quaintance, Asher Bradshaw, Kiko Francisco and many more.  madeinvenicemovie.com