Dan MacFarlane’s Latest Video

Dan MacFarlane’s Latest Video

I’ve known Dan MacFarlane for a number of years and frankly, he’s one of the most gifted skaters I’ve ever encountered.
Besides having an incredible style and creativity, Dan’s “gift” to skateboarding is his extra-ordinary ability to teach others how to skate. His instructional videos have been seen by hundreds of thousands of skaters and have had a tremendous impact.
Using video to teach skaters is a powerful way to engage people.

Behold, Dan’s latest masterpiece.
Source: CW from MyStyle

Catalysts – Part 3

Catalysts – Part 3

The 5th Catalyst – The Extreme/X Games – 1995By the early 1990’s, skateboarding was in free-fall and the industry tried to figure out what had caused the crash. In a meeting in January of 1994, a group of skateboard executives pointed out the obvious:

  1. Too many pros
  2. Not enough diversity – too much emphasis on street skateboarding
  3. Too much focus on the hardcore skaters – not enough focus on fun for all  By 1995, ESPN 2 had launched the Extreme Games and while some in the skateworld bemoaned its commercial sensibilities, there was no question this was going to impact skateboarding. The visibility was huge and Tony Hawk (after a decade and half of being a pro) finally got the fame he so richly deserved. By 1999, skateboarding was on fire once again. The focus was mostly on street skateboarding, with a bit of vert and transition. On the horizon was another genre within skateboarding – Longboarding and in 1999, I launched the publication International Longboarder.

 

The 6th Catalyst – Dogtown and Z Boys Documentary – 2001Although this film was released in 2001 at the Sundance Film Festival, it didn’t get major attention until 2002. The film features the dramatic stories of skate pioneers the Z Boys and was the breakout hit at Sundance . The film was the first time that skateboarding’s rich cultural history was explored and it lit a fuse. The documentary effortlessly meshed the Southern California surf experience with the punk rock ethos that dominated the late 1970’s skate world. Four years after its release, Vans (who had helped finance the film) found itself on a complete rebound financially. It opened up people’s eyes to the roots of different types of riding and captured people’s imagination. It brought in a lot of former skaters and sparked tremendous interest in the history of skateboarding.